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3 Reasons to Put the Brakes on Fast Fashion

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Do you find yourself discarding old clothes once new styles are launched? You might be a victim of fast fashion! This practice refers to the global trend of disposing clothing designs and styles at an alarmingly fast pace to make way for new apparel.

 

Here’s why fast fashion needs to be stopped right now.

 

Depletion of Water Sources

Cotton is unarguably the most widely used raw material in the textile industry. However, the cotton crop requires gallons of water for its cultivation. Add to this the amount of water consumed in the production process, cotton garments use up a large chunk of water resources.

 

In fact, according to WWF, 2,700 liters of water are used to produce a single cotton t-shirt!

 

Water depletion isn’t caused just by the cultivating process, however. The chemicals and dyes used during production make their way into rivers and streams, polluting the water bodies. This kills aquatic life and poses numerous health risks to humans as well.

 

Shortage of Landfills

Did you know that over 12.8 million tons of textile waste ends up in landfills each year? This is an astounding figure, considering the environmental concerns it raises. Although landfills are a feasible option for certain types of waste, textiles aren’t among them. This is because fabrics decompose over a period of several years, taking up landfill space this entire time.

 

Fast fashion causes an increased disposal of garments. The growing amount of textile waste sent to landfills each year has resulted in a shortage of space. The piles of discarded fabric and footwear take up a huge portion of the designated area. This makes it difficult for other types of biodegradable waste to be transferred in landfills.

 

Exploitation of Workers

In addition to the environmental concerns, fast fashion also poses social concerns. With clothing companies competing to launch new products each season, there’s also a growing demand of labor.

 

Clothing industries often use unethical and even illegal practices to avail cheap labor, exploiting their workers.  According to the documentary The True Cost, one out of six individuals is employed in the global fashion industry for this purpose. The labor force mainly consists of women, who’re paid less than $3 each day.

Companies also go against t

he strict child labor laws in their quest to find cheap labor. This mostly happens in developing or underdeveloped countries where the manufacturing process is outsourced.

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Here at Whitehouse & Schapiro, LLC, we’ve taken up initiatives to encourage eco-fashion through recycling garments and using mixed rags.

Donate your used clothes to us to stop this trend from escalating!