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Industries with the Largest Fabric Waste

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In South Korean culture, it’s common for senior students to gather and donate their hand-me-to-downs to their juniors to wear to graduation ceremonies.

 

In some cultures, it’s become a tradition for families to not purchase new clothing for their youngest children. These communities focus on recycling clothes by handing them down from the eldest to the youngest family members.

 

Once the clothes are worn out, they are either donated to charities, or used for household chores (such as cleaning, dusting, mopping floors etc.)

 

This practice is prevalent in Asian countries, and has become a significant part of the culture, mainly for South Asians.

 

However, in the West, despite there being campaigns about the importance of recycling, fabric waste is still a major issue. In the U.S. alone, 13 million tons of clothing is wasted annually.

 

Britons were expected to have wasted 325 million clothing products this year in spring.

 

But the grim reality is, consumers are not the only ones who are guilty of waste. Many industries also practice fabric waste. Here are a few of them:

 

Hospitality Industry

The hospitality industry is known for its food wastage, it totals up to an average of 600,000 tons per year.

 

However, that’s only the tip of the iceberg. The hospitality business also contributes to fabric waste. With pillowcases, towels, blankets, and employee uniforms being dumped in landfills, instead of being distributed to charity, many companies pertaining to hospitality services are responsible for fabric waste.

 

The Fashion Industry

The fashion industry is the largest contributor to textile waste. With the latest trends dominating the world of fashion, customers follow the latest fashion magazines to get an idea of what is new and in style.

 

Most of these trends are seasonal, with winter and summer clothing being completely different. Most fashion designers are required to be innovative and bring in fresh perspective. This means that clothes that were in vogue last season will no longer be relevant today.

 

Shoe Manufacturers

While technically not a part of the textile industry in the traditional sense, shoes also use fabrics and materials. With shoes becoming second in line when it comes to textile waste, shoe manufacturing companies tend to follow fashion designers, in hopes of creating products that are complementary to the latest designs.

 

Instead of throwing away unwanted clothes and apparel, donating them to those in need can create a significant difference. If you are a part of any of the industries mentioned above, donate leftover stock and unwanted clothes to Whitehouse & Schapiro.

 

We focus on creating awareness by distributing secondhand clothes to charities and institutions. From old clothes to shoes, we provide domestic and international businesses with credential clothing, as well as secondhand items.

 

Feel free to contact us to learn more about our services.